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Section 18
Children & Adolescents:
TMH Interpersonal Dimensions

Question 18 | Test | Table of Contents
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Social Workers, Couneslors, MFT's, and Psychologists

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Peer-Reviewed Journal Article References:
Barnett, J. E., & Kolmes, K. (2016). The practice of tele-mental health: Ethical, legal, and clinical issues for practitioners. Practice Innovations, 1(1), 53–66.

Helm, S., Kissinger, D., Goebert, D., Agoha, R., Tanabe, R., & Alicata, D. (2016). Child and adolescent telepsychiatry in an academic-community partnership: Providers’ perceptions on teamwork. Journal of Rural Mental Health, 40(2), 103–112.

Stewart, R. W., Orengo-Aguayo, R., Young, J., Wallace, M. M., Cohen, J. A., Mannarino, A. P., & de Arellano, M. A. (2020). Feasibility and effectiveness of a telehealth service delivery model for treating childhood posttraumatic stress: A community-based, open pilot trial of trauma-focused cognitive–behavioral therapy. Journal of Psychotherapy Integration, 30(2), 274–289.

QUESTION 18
For children or adolescents eye contact is an important developmental consideration especially when assessing anxiety depression psychosis, autism spectrum disorders, and attachment disorders. A camera mounted above the monitor will cause the child to appear to be looking downward perhaps suggesting depression or anxiety. Conversely a camera placed below the monitor will make the child appear to be looking upward conveying the possibility of autism spectrum disorder these views might falsely confess they difficulties in relatedness and rapport building. What is the solution? To select and enter your answer go to Test.


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Section 19
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